‘”Crowned, and Discrowned and Decapitated”: Delacroix’s The Execution of the Doge Marino Faliero and its Critics’

Marijke Jonker: ‘“Crowned, and Discrowned and Decapitated”: Delacroix’s The Execution of the Doge Marino Faliero and its Critics‘. In: Nineteenth-century art worldwide, vol. Autumn, 2010.

Delacroix’s Execution of the Doge Marino Faliero (1826) was the subject of reviews by the painter’s political allies Auguste Jal and Ludovic Vitet, which bordered on the openly hostile; Delacroix had conjured up a vision of Charles X’s recent pompous, theatrical Sacre in this depiction of an equally theatrical Medieval execution ritual, known from Byron’s tragedy Marino Faliero. Delacroix’s irreverent, menacing blend, realized with the help of excessive theatre and color effect, was seen by both critics to undermine the elevating character of history painting, which they defended even while sharing Delacroix’s anti-royalist feelings.

Click here to read the article: “Crowned, and Discrowned and Decapitated”: Delacroix’s The Execution of the Doge Marino Faliero and its Critics (direct link)

Ann. posted 2010-12-11